Disruptive technologies and shifting demographics are redefining the workforce.

FIND A SOLUTION  AT  Academic Writers Bay

Redefining Workplace Learning For The 21st Century
By Jenny Dearborn, Vice President, Chief Learning Officer, SuccessFactors – an SAP company
Forbes, October 2013
Disruptive technologies and shifting demographics are redefining the workforce. In response, smart companies are reinventing workplace learning in an effort to make their programs more relevant and effective, and to create a culture that encourages continuous learning and develops innovative leaders at all levels of the organization.
“Today, workplace learning has achieved mission-critical status,” says Sam Herring, CEO of Intrepid Learning. “Global CEOs face an environment that is more competitive than ever—one in which they live or die by their ability to lead innovation, which can only be realized by having world-class talent that is highly competent, motivated and engaged. Top companies understand this connection, and they know that success requires more than waging a war to acquire talent; it requires that they strategically develop the talent they need to envision and execute the business strategies that will make them successful in the future.”
Get out of the classroom
For most of the last century, workplace learning had a familiar look and feel:  students sat in rows taking notes as an expert stood at the front of the room and dispensed information. Technology offered new ways to communicate and learn, but all too often technology-based learning programs turned out to be little more than upgraded versions of the same traditional K-12 model.
Today, that is changing rapidly. New advances in mobile devices and cloud technology, a deeper understanding of neuroscience and how humans learn best, and the emergence of the millennial workforce—the tech-savvy generation that is the largest in U.S. history—is creating a growing demand for more innovative and informal approaches to workplace learning.
“Employees no longer see their careers as the function of a single organization, but as the culmination of a purposeful set of development experiences they own themselves,” says Mary Slaughter, senior vice president and chief talent officer at Sun Trust. “When you combine their motivations with ubiquitous, on-demand access to skills and knowledge, and the unrelenting pressure to increase workplace productivity, it’s fruitless to maintain traditional, static learning architectures.”
How workplace learning is changing
In the very near future, workplace learning will be about social collaboration, team-based activities, and decentralized peer-to-peer learning. Learning will be mobile, and access will be continuous and instantaneous. Workers will attend fewer scheduled classes and online training sessions. Instead, short videos, game-like simulations, and peer communities that offer networking, information sharing and informal coaching will engage and motivate workers by delivering “anyplace, anytime learning.”
In the future, workplace learning will be increasingly experiential and relationship-based, knowledge will come from everywhere, and companies won’t be able to control or standardize it. Corporate-sponsored training will become less important and knowledge assessments or certifications will become more important. Companies won’t care how their employees acquire knowledge or obtain a certain skill or ability, but only that they canprove their expertise.
“Companies that understand the power of learning are thinking holistically about how learning happens in the workplace, and they are seeking to create environments where learning thrives,” Herring says. “They understand that classroom training (or derivatives such as e-learning or virtual classroom sessions) isn’t enough. They know that an effective learning environment often must include performance support to provide ongoing reinforcement, easy access to knowledge repositories for quick micro-learning lessons, collaborative communities to tap the wisdom of the crowds, and most importantly, abundant opportunities to practice new skills in the work environment, to reflect on one’s performance, and to improve.”
Learning should be continuous
Employees should begin their workplace learning their first day on the job—and never stop. No one should ever wait for a training class or direction from management to get what they need to be successful. Considering the rate at which information changes and the nature of our always-on culture, employees must be pr…

Assignment status: Already Solved By Our Experts

(USA, AUS, UK & CA  PhD. Writers)

>> CLICK HERE TO ORDER 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM Academic Writers Bay <<

#065

Disruptive technologies and shifting demographics are redefining

FIND A SOLUTION  AT  Academic Writers Bay

Redefining Workplace Learning For The 21st Century
By Jenny Dearborn, Vice President, Chief Learning Officer, SuccessFactors – an SAP company
Forbes, October 2013
Disruptive technologies and shifting demographics are redefining the workforce. In response, smart companies are reinventing workplace learning in an effort to make their programs more relevant and effective, and to create a culture that encourages continuous learning and develops innovative leaders at all levels of the organization.
“Today, workplace learning has achieved mission-critical status,” says Sam Herring, CEO of Intrepid Learning. “Global CEOs face an environment that is more competitive than ever—one in which they live or die by their ability to lead innovation, which can only be realized by having world-class talent that is highly competent, motivated and engaged. Top companies understand this connection, and they know that success requires more than waging a war to acquire talent; it requires that they strategically develop the talent they need to envision and execute the business strategies that will make them successful in the future.”
Get out of the classroom
For most of the last century, workplace learning had a familiar look and feel:  students sat in rows taking notes as an expert stood at the front of the room and dispensed information. Technology offered new ways to communicate and learn, but all too often technology-based learning programs turned out to be little more than upgraded versions of the same traditional K-12 model.
Today, that is changing rapidly. New advances in mobile devices and cloud technology, a deeper understanding of neuroscience and how humans learn best, and the emergence of the millennial workforce—the tech-savvy generation that is the largest in U.S. history—is creating a growing demand for more innovative and informal approaches to workplace learning.
“Employees no longer see their careers as the function of a single organization, but as the culmination of a purposeful set of development experiences they own themselves,” says Mary Slaughter, senior vice president and chief talent officer at Sun Trust. “When you combine their motivations with ubiquitous, on-demand access to skills and knowledge, and the unrelenting pressure to increase workplace productivity, it’s fruitless to maintain traditional, static learning architectures.”
How workplace learning is changing
In the very near future, workplace learning will be about social collaboration, team-based activities, and decentralized peer-to-peer learning. Learning will be mobile, and access will be continuous and instantaneous. Workers will attend fewer scheduled classes and online training sessions. Instead, short videos, game-like simulations, and peer communities that offer networking, information sharing and informal coaching will engage and motivate workers by delivering “anyplace, anytime learning.”
In the future, workplace learning will be increasingly experiential and relationship-based, knowledge will come from everywhere, and companies won’t be able to control or standardize it. Corporate-sponsored training will become less important and knowledge assessments or certifications will become more important. Companies won’t care how their employees acquire knowledge or obtain a certain skill or ability, but only that they canprove their expertise.
“Companies that understand the power of learning are thinking holistically about how learning happens in the workplace, and they are seeking to create environments where learning thrives,” Herring says. “They understand that classroom training (or derivatives such as e-learning or virtual classroom sessions) isn’t enough. They know that an effective learning environment often must include performance support to provide ongoing reinforcement, easy access to knowledge repositories for quick micro-learning lessons, collaborative communities to tap the wisdom of the crowds, and most importantly, abundant opportunities to practice new skills in the work environment, to reflect on one’s performance, and to improve.”
Learning should be continuous
Employees should begin their workplace learning their first day on the job—and never stop. No one should ever wait for a training class or direction from management to get what they need to be successful. Considering the rate at which information changes and the nature of our always-on culture, employees must be pr…

Assignment status: Already Solved By Our Experts

(USA, AUS, UK & CA  PhD. Writers)

>> CLICK HERE TO ORDER 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM Academic Writers Bay <<

#065

Should Teachers Be Able to Remove Disruptive Students

FIND A SOLUTION  AT  Academic Writers Bay

Within a democracy everyone has rights; however those rights end when they are used to abuse or hinder the rights of another person within that democracy. For instance everyone has the right to entertain themselves with a listening device on the train, yet they are asked by transit authorities to use headphones so that their right to entertainment does not violate the other passengers right to peaceful, quiet commute. It is a teacher’s duty to ensure that students understand these social skills that are required of them in this democratic society.
So although removing a disruptive student from a classroom is sometimes viewed as the neglecting and the rejecting of that particular student it is very often the beginning of that student’s long road to having some very complex issues resolved. As was stated in one of the previous chapter, aggression and excessively disorderly conduct is more often than not the manifestation of some very serious emotional grievances. It can also be sign that the child is suffering from an undiagnosed disorder.
Although the latter is less likely to be the case it should not be ruled out. Sometimes due to a lack of knowledge about a particular disorder can cause parents to overlook certain characteristics of a condition that their children may be exhibiting. In other cases it is the parents’ unwillingness to accept the facts that are presented to them concerning their child that prevents them from seeking help for their child. This unwillingness might be due to a variety of emotions including fear and denial.
Whatever the case may be these children continue to battle with these disorders and completely exhaust the efforts of those that are forced to share a classroom with them since there are almost always in need of much more than the classroom setting can offer them. Sadly, identifying underlying emotional problems can be a little more complex but the cooperation of the parents is also needed in this area. In cases where the parent is not able to or is not willing to cooperate with a teacher who is trying to encourage a child to exhibit more sociable behavior the teacher is left with very few options.
For if that parent is not even willing to acknowledge that the behavior of his or her child is out of control, there will be attempt to try and discover what the source of the behavior might be. Again the removal of that student from the classroom may encourage the parent to evaluate the seriousness of the situation and this resulting communication might bring both the teacher and the parent one step closer to uncovering problem which is what the main focus should always be.
Those who oppose giving this authority to teachers expect them to prepare lesson plans that will create and maintain a positive learning environment for the entire class, make sure that students are prepared to take the ever increasing state mandated test, and still be able to constantly council and pacify students who have decided to constantly disrupt the class; all within the allotted six to seven hour day, which is farther broken down into forty five minute periods for each class.

Assignment status: Already Solved By Our Experts

(USA, AUS, UK & CA  PhD. Writers)

>> CLICK HERE TO ORDER 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM Academic Writers Bay <<

#065

Compare disruptive and sustaining technologies and explain how the Internet and WWW caused business…

FIND A SOLUTION  AT  Academic Writers Bay

Compare disruptive and sustaining technologies and explain how the Internet and WWW caused business disruption.
Text: Business Driven Information Systems, Ch. 3.1 & 3.2: Web 1.0: Ebusiness & Web 2.0: Business 2.0
#1
Compare disruptive and sustaining technologies and explain how the Internet and WWW caused business disruption.
#2
Describe ebusiness and its associated advantages.
#3
Compare the four ebusiness models.
#4
Describe the six ebusiness tools for connecting and communicating.
#5
Identify the four challenges associated with ebusiness.
Text: Business Driven Information Systems, Ch. 4.2: Information Security
#6
Describe the relationships and differences between hackers and viruses.
#7
Describe the relationship between information security policies and an information security plan.
#8
Provide an example of each of the three primary information security areas: (1) authentication and authorization, (2) prevention and resistance, and (3) detection and response.
Text: Business Driven Information Systems, Ch. 5.1: MIS Infrastructures
#9
Explain MIS infrastructure and its three primary types.
#10
Identify the three primary areas associated with an information MIS infrastructure.
#11
Describe the characteristics of an agile MIS infrastructure.
Topic: Compare disruptive and sustaining technologies and explain how the Internet and WWW caused business disruption.

The Best Academic Writing Company

Assignment status: Already Solved By Our Experts

(USA, AUS, UK & CA  PhD. Writers)

>> CLICK HERE TO ORDER 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM Academic Writers Bay <<

#075

Topic: Uber Vs Cabs: Defend why Uber is or is not disruptive based on Clayton Christensen vs Robin…

FIND A SOLUTION  AT  Academic Writers Bay

Topic: Uber Vs Cabs: Defend why Uber is or is not disruptive based on Clayton Christensen vs Robin chase
Topic: Uber Vs Cabs: Defend why Uber is or is not disruptive based on Clayton Christensen vs Robin chase
Reference style: APA
Word Count: 3000 words
Duration allowed: 48 Hours
Order description
3,000+ words analyzing a pre-approved case or industry.
Examples of acceptable cases for analysis include: Uber versus cabs.
You need to show how the theoretical models for disruption inform the actions of either an attacker or an incumbent.
Three Basic Archetypes
New Business Attacker
Incumbent Responding to a Single Major Disruptor
Complex Incumbent Responding to Multiple Disruptions
Basic Structure
What is the starting situation and industry context? (Constraints
What is the nature of the disruption (Supply, Demand, or Marketplace)?
As an attacker how are you capitalizing? As a defender how are you responding?
What in the next major move in the industry? How can you shift the battlefield to your advantage?
The preponderance of your paper should be focused on the recommendations and supporting logic/evidence.
Topic: Topic: Uber Vs Cabs: Defend why Uber is or is not disruptive based on Clayton Christensen vs Robin chase

The Best Academic Writing Company

Assignment status: Already Solved By Our Experts

(USA, AUS, UK & CA  PhD. Writers)

>> CLICK HERE TO ORDER 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM Academic Writers Bay <<

#075

Original essay on: Disruptive technologies and shifting demographics are

FIND A SOLUTION  AT  Academic Writers Bay

Redefining Workplace Learning For The 21st Century
By Jenny Dearborn, Vice President, Chief Learning Officer, SuccessFactors – an SAP company
Forbes, October 2013
Disruptive technologies and shifting demographics are redefining the workforce. In response, smart companies are reinventing workplace learning in an effort to make their programs more relevant and effective, and to create a culture that encourages continuous learning and develops innovative leaders at all levels of the organization.
“Today, workplace learning has achieved mission-critical status,” says Sam Herring, CEO of Intrepid Learning. “Global CEOs face an environment that is more competitive than ever—one in which they live or die by their ability to lead innovation, which can only be realized by having world-class talent that is highly competent, motivated and engaged. Top companies understand this connection, and they know that success requires more than waging a war to acquire talent; it requires that they strategically develop the talent they need to envision and execute the business strategies that will make them successful in the future.”
Get out of the classroom
For most of the last century, workplace learning had a familiar look and feel:  students sat in rows taking notes as an expert stood at the front of the room and dispensed information. Technology offered new ways to communicate and learn, but all too often technology-based learning programs turned out to be little more than upgraded versions of the same traditional K-12 model.
Today, that is changing rapidly. New advances in mobile devices and cloud technology, a deeper understanding of neuroscience and how humans learn best, and the emergence of the millennial workforce—the tech-savvy generation that is the largest in U.S. history—is creating a growing demand for more innovative and informal approaches to workplace learning.
“Employees no longer see their careers as the function of a single organization, but as the culmination of a purposeful set of development experiences they own themselves,” says Mary Slaughter, senior vice president and chief talent officer at Sun Trust. “When you combine their motivations with ubiquitous, on-demand access to skills and knowledge, and the unrelenting pressure to increase workplace productivity, it’s fruitless to maintain traditional, static learning architectures.”
How workplace learning is changing
In the very near future, workplace learning will be about social collaboration, team-based activities, and decentralized peer-to-peer learning. Learning will be mobile, and access will be continuous and instantaneous. Workers will attend fewer scheduled classes and online training sessions. Instead, short videos, game-like simulations, and peer communities that offer networking, information sharing and informal coaching will engage and motivate workers by delivering “anyplace, anytime learning.”
In the future, workplace learning will be increasingly experiential and relationship-based, knowledge will come from everywhere, and companies won’t be able to control or standardize it. Corporate-sponsored training will become less important and knowledge assessments or certifications will become more important. Companies won’t care how their employees acquire knowledge or obtain a certain skill or ability, but only that they canprove their expertise.
“Companies that understand the power of learning are thinking holistically about how learning happens in the workplace, and they are seeking to create environments where learning thrives,” Herring says. “They understand that classroom training (or derivatives such as e-learning or virtual classroom sessions) isn’t enough. They know that an effective learning environment often must include performance support to provide ongoing reinforcement, easy access to knowledge repositories for quick micro-learning lessons, collaborative communities to tap the wisdom of the crowds, and most importantly, abundant opportunities to practice new skills in the work environment, to reflect on one’s performance, and to improve.”
Learning should be continuous
Employees should begin their workplace learning their first day on the job—and never stop. No one should ever wait for a training class or direction from management to get what they need to be successful. Considering the rate at which information changes and the nature of our always-on culture, employees must be pr…

Assignment status: Already Solved By Our Experts

(USA, AUS, UK & CA  PhD. Writers)

>> CLICK HERE TO ORDER 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM Academic Writers Bay <<

#065

Original essay on: Disruptive Innovation vs Disruptive Technology:

FIND A SOLUTION  AT  Academic Writers Bay

Technology Innovation Management Review December 2014www.timreview.ca 27Disruptive Innovation vs Disruptive Technology:
The Disruptive Potential of the Value
Propositions of 3D Printing Technology StartupsFinn Hahn, Søren Jensen, and Stoyan TanevIntroduction3D printing is a term used to describe the production of
tangible products by means of digitally controlled machine tools. The novelty of this manufacturing approach consists of the selective addition of materials
layer-upon-layer, rather than through machining from
solid material objects, moulding, or casting. There is
clearly articulated perception by both scholars and
practitioners that 3D printing technologies have the potential to change the traditional manufacturing
paradigm as well as to enable the emergence of new innovation practices based on mass customization, user
design, and distributed product innovation. As a result,
3D printing is considered to be a truly disruptive technology. At the same time, however, it is an emerging
technology that is exploited today by only a small number of early global adopters (McKinsey & Company,
2013). It appears to be significantly over-hyped, which
could potentially demotivate the variety of potential adopters who could influence the dynamics of its technology adoption life cycle.
The existing literature focusing on 3D printing is very
scarce and appears to suffer from a “double disease”.
First, it appears dominated by consultancy reports and
reviews by practitioners, which lack the methodological
depth and the predictive power of serious research
studies. Such publications contribute to the hype
without offering much analytical substance. Second, it
is dominated by technical publications, which, although highly valuable, focus on the engineering aspects of the technologies and much less on the specific
ways they are expected to disrupt the existing manufacturing and innovation practices. In addition, there
seems to be confusion in the use of the terms “disruptive technology” and “disruptive innovation”
(Christensen, 2006; Schmidt et al., 2008; Hang et al.,
2011), which does not really help in examining the market opportunities associated with specific 3D printing
technologies. All this suggests the need for more systematic studies focusing on the potential business and
investment opportunities associated with the emergence of 3D printing technologies.
This article describes an empirical study focusing on the classification of existing business
opportunities in the 3D printing technology sector. The authors address three research
questions. First, how do technology startups integrate new 3D printing technologies into
specific market offers? Second, which value propositions are most attractive in terms of interest from the public and investors? Third, how does the degree of disruptiveness of value
propositions relate to the degree of interest from the public and investors? The most notable finding is the link between the business traction of 3D printing technology startups
and the degree of disruptiveness of their value propositions. Thus, the article provides empirical support for the conceptualization of the degree of disruptiveness of the value proposition as a metric for the evaluation of the business potential of new technology startups.The distinctions we use to build a language and
discuss strategy are as commonsense as left/right
and up/down, but they rise from the specifics of the
business context rather than everyday life.J.-C. Spender
Engineer, professor, and author“ ”Technology Innovation Management Review December 2014www.timreview.ca 28The Disruptive Potential of the Value Propositions of 3D Printing Technology StartupsFinn Hahn, Søren Jensen, and Stoyan TanevThe present article addresses the lack of literature on
3D printing innovation by offering the results of an empirical study focusing on the classification of emerging
business opportunities in the 3D printing technology
sector. It starts with a brief description of the technology sector and continues with the description of the
methodology. One of the key research steps includ…

Assignment status: Already Solved By Our Experts

(USA, AUS, UK & CA  PhD. Writers)

>> CLICK HERE TO ORDER 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM Academic Writers Bay <<

#065

Question 1 i. What is the meaning of the term “disruptive technology”?

FIND A SOLUTION  AT  Academic Writers Bay

GET SOLUTION at academicwritersbay.com
Question 1 i. What is the meaning of the term “disruptive technology”?

Question 1 i. What is the meaning of the term “disruptive technology”? (1 mark) ii. List 3 examples of a disruptive technology you have used in the past 12 months (or are familiar with) and briefly explain in what way it has been disruptive to the existing market. (2 marks) Question 2 Consumer engagement in e-commerce is well established in Australia and throughout many parts of the world. Estimates of e-commerce sales for the first quarter o …
Assignment status: Solved by our Experts.
Source: © AcademicWritersBay.com

>> 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM AcademicWritersBay.com <<

Assignment status: Already Solved By Our Experts

(USA, AUS, UK & CA  PhD. Writers)

>> CLICK HERE TO ORDER 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM Academic Writers Bay <<

#065

What strategies might you suggest to decrease the student’s disruptive behavior and increase his engagement?

FIND A SOLUTION  AT  Academic Writers Bay

Create PowerPoint: Classroom ExpectationsImagine you have been, assigned as the teacher-mentor for Mr. Chase.
How would you respond to and support the teacher? What strategies might you suggest to decrease the student’s disruptive behavior and increase his engagement?
Direction: Create 1 – slide for each Power-point questions below and respond: Using APA style. References or other references. ( 150-300 words)
 

Assignment status: Already Solved By Our Experts

(USA, AUS, UK & CA  PhD. Writers)

>> CLICK HERE TO ORDER 100% ORIGINAL PAPERS FROM Academic Writers Bay <<

#055